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OpenAI’s Sam Altman talks love, dark AI, regulations, and more

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Sam Altman, the boyish face of artificial intelligence, spoke on the technology that has people excited and afraid in equal measure at ET Conversations in New Delhi. In a special edition ETtech Morning Dispatch today, we bring you all the highlights from the evening. ■ Byju’s plans more job cuts to slash costs ■ Petitioners against Google get relief from Madras HC ■ WhatsApp launches ‘Channels’, roll out in India soon Sam Altman, the 38-year-old chief executive of OpenAI, spoke in a , vice chairman of Times Internet covering a vast range of topics, from their days at Stanford, through the birth of the company that gave the world ChatGPT, to the future of artificial intelligence and the impact of the technology.

We are a company that is trying to figure out how to build AGI (artificial general intelligence) and responsibly deploy that for maximum benefit. On the one hand, this is the most exciting, most promising, coolest thing I think that humanity has built. On the other, there are concerns about the darker aspects of this technology.

We want to be a force to help manage those demons. India has been a country that has . We heard about a farmer who wasn’t able to access government services, but hooked up to ChatGPT via WhatsApp in some sort of complicated way, and was then able to.

There’s a lot of fear about the impact this is going to have on elections, on society, and on the media. But I think that society is going to rise to the occasion. We’ll have techniques like watermarking detectors.

I want to be super clear. I don’t think current systems are dangerous. I don’t think GPT-4 poses an existential risk to the world.

But people are not good at thinking about exponential growth. And GPT-10 may be an extremely different thing. There’s a 1% chance that we might get this wrong.

In a discussion moderated by ETtech Editor, Samidha Sharma, Sam Altman and OpenAI Policy Researcher Sandhini Agarwal from a highly-engaged audience. The chief executive of OpenAI called it a tremendously exciting time for businesses, dismissing the all-gloom-and-doom narrative on AI. We’ve explicitly said there should be no regulation on smaller companies, that it’s important to let the current open source models flourish.

The only regulation we’ve called for is on people like us or bigger. I totally get why people are sceptical when they hear someone running one of the bigger companies call for regulation. But we think it’s important.

I think this is the most exciting time to start a company since the dawn of the internet. I think this is going to be bigger than mobile, it might turn out to be bigger than the internet. I hope it does.

Which means that anything you do can be huge. I think AI will be a force for decentralisation in a very powerful way. I too feared that there was going to be one super intelligence in the sky that we hoped was good and liked us.

Now I think we’ll have a bunch of systems that’ll help us be more productive. Even before Altman sat down for the conversation, India’s tech, startup, and venture meisters were abuzz, to the ‘chat behind ChatGPT’. With the gathered guests lauding Altman for his openness and vision of building a responsible future with AI, it was clear that the fireside chat left several wondering about the pace in which businesses would be disrupted.

Samir Jain of The Times of India Group asked Altman about love as an algorithm: greater than that between mother and child, or man and wife? “I hope we don’t all fall in love with robots,” Altman replied on behalf of humanity. “That would be deeply depressing. I hope we are all the best versions of ourselves, figure out how to be better.

These systems could help make us more present for each other and treat each other better’’. Like fire, AI can unleash civilisational progress and havoc. Speaking as one of its fathers, , hanging on to his every word on what this shape-shifting animal can do to jobs, to the world, what this means for education, and his involvement in one of the main things that power AI — power (the electrical kind).

“It was inspiring to listen to Sam Altman talk about the future of AI and OpenAI. His honest and transparent take on concerns relating to AI was refreshing and encouraging’’. “While ‘overhyped’ short term capital allocation will make sure that opportunities in AI are captured, it was great to see the global dialogue underway to manage the threats.

” “It was fascinating to hear the views of someone who is at the centre of AGI (artificial general intelligence), pioneering such systems. Time will tell whether or not such a transition was brought about in a responsible manner. ” “The time has come for academic institutions to seriously deliberate on curriculum review so as to prepare students for the future of jobs.

Responsible innovation is certainly an area that requires focus as we rapidly embrace AI and generative AI’’. “It’s great to know that other than AI, nuclear fusion is a big thing on his (Sam Altman’s) mind. In addition to AI, the world also has something to look forward to in the energy domain”.

“It was a pleasure to hear about the tremendous possibilities and concerns of AI straight from Sam Altman. AI has the potential to change the world as we know it. We in the government have to work towards ensuring that these changes are beneficial for humanity as a whole, and that disruptions in the short term are minimised.

” “I walked away truly inspired by Sam’s vision of democratising human intelligence and energy to create a better world’’. In the midst of valuation markdowns and issues around its $1. 2 billion loan, beleaguered edtech major in another cost-cutting exercise to streamline its operations.

Many of these employees are contractual staff across on-ground sales teams from third-party staffers such as Randstad and Channelplay. Byju’s hires or lets go of these staff members on the basis of seasonality and demand for the business. Also read | The saga of layoffs at Byju’s began last year, when the company in one of the largest ‘rationalisation exercises’ by an Indian startup.

Earlier this year, , including many in senior strategy, technology, and product roles. The cost correction comes right on the heels of the company earlier this week (TLB), which is the subject of litigation. Last month, BlackRock, a minority shareholder with less than a 1% stake in Byju’s, We’ve launched three indices – ET Ecommerce, ET Ecommerce Profitable, and ET Ecommerce Non-Profitable – to track the performance of recently listed tech firms.

Here’s how they’ve fared so far. On Thursday, the Madras High Court that have filed petitions against it from the company’s Play Store. The companies had sought relief from the court in their ongoing battle against Google over its billing practices.

At the same time, it also asked the startups to submit a report to Google on the total number of downloads they recorded in June, and directed them to pay a 4% commission to the search giant. A while back, Bharat Matrimony, Shaadi. com, and some other companies had approached the high court challenging Google’s billing policies and seeking to stop the company from kicking them off the Play Store.

On Monday, ET had reported that Unacademy, Kuku FM, TrulyMadly, and QuackQuack had tech titan. Thereafter, three other companies — Aha, Stage and Kutumb — also sought relief. The court’s orders on Thursday apply to all these firms.

Indian IT earns around 40% of its revenues from BFSI solutions, where it in deal closure cycles amid macroeconomic concerns that are hurting the global banking sector. Meta said to send text, photos, videos, stickers, and polls. It will be available in a new tab called Updates — where a user will find their contacts’ Status, and the channels they choose to follow.

This will be separate from a user’s chats with family, friends, and communities. Apple’s Vision Pro is the retina display moment for headsets ( ) The bizarre reality of getting online in North Korea ( ) Fans use AI deepfakes to keep a slain Indian rapper’s voice alive ( ).


From: economictimes_indiatimes
URL: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/newsletters/morning-dispatch/subject-openais-sam-altman-talks-love-dark-ai-regulations-and-more/articleshow/100861794.cms

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